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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
that the u.s. has had these past 20 years and would not allow discrimination against persons with disabilities around the world. and yet, those opponents had concern about the fact it's a u.n. treaty, raised questions about could it give in essence cover to countries that don't do a very good job but could be saying they signed on to this treaty. other questions like it's a lame-duck session, don't do it now, do it later. those sorts of arguments against. there were a number of republicans who voted for this joining the democrats, but not enough, because the treaty does require two-thirds. today that meant 66 with one senator not present, and we watched this passion coming out before the vote when bob dole, his wife elizabeth dole, both former senators, were on the floor, dole in his wheelchair and many members of the senate from both parties came over, gestures of goodwill and then when the vote actually happened, of course, dole and his wife kind of moved back off of the senate floor and we watched it unfold. there was one senator, a republican, that initially voted yea and
, the u.s. is concerned about what they're seeing in libya, according to all reports, that some of the weapons that were supplied through middle men have now gotten to terror groups. they're concerned about tracking the weapons and about possible blowback depending what kind of regime replace assad because no one thinks this regime will survive, whether it takes weeks, months, or a year. no one really thinks and you are a lot closer to it than all of us that assad is going to survive. >> it doesn't seem like assad is going to survive. when i went in a few days ago, i wasn't sure as well if he had a few more days, if he had a few more weeks. i don't think that this is going tolg very quickly. i would say a few more months. i explained this to -- or described it to one of our editors that imagine there's a big iceberg or a big wedge of ice and you are chipping at it with an ice pick. initially you just get tiny little flakes. eventually big chunks start to come off, and chunks are now coming off. the assad regime is breaking apart. rebel units are being -- are winning and taking o
direct combat duty. zoey is a captain in the u.s. marine corps reserves and plaintiff in the lawsuit, air yell la is a senior staff attorney for the aclu women rights project. thanks so much. captain bodell, you deployed twice to afghanistan and basically left the active duty marines corps because you were blocked from the combat duty. what is the difference, the most important difference, between being able to be in combat and not? >> well, to be clear, women are serving in combat and i was in charge of a team called the female gaugement team -- engagement team and i had 47 marines and they were in combat if that unit was attacked, they were attacked with them. so i do want to make clear women are in combat and we're asking that the policy be changed to reflect the reality of what's happening on the ground. >> i mean -- >> exactly. the point you're making is that in these wars, there's to front line, there's no rear guard. once you've deployed you are in combat, you are subject to all of the duties and the risks inherent in that but you're not permitted to have combat status and that des
clinton holds emergency talks with russia as u.s. officials confirm reports that the syrian military is prepared to launch chemical weapons against its own people. >> we've made it very clear what our position is with respect to chemical weapons and i think we will discuss that and many other aspects. >> the whole world is watching. the whole world is watching very closely. and the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. >> plus, sharp criticism from afghan president karzai. the exclusive nbc interview. why he says the u.s. is partly to blame for the growing instability in his country. >>> and the duchess of cambridge leaves the hospital after being treated for acute morning sickness. her royal father-in-law couldn't be happier. >> i'm not a radio station? >> grandfather, that's splendid. that's great she's getting better. >> good day, i'm chris cillizza in for andrea mitchell live in washington. behind the bluster and the rhetoric, what happens going on behind the scenes in the budget negotiations? and big breaking news in this town. senat
, killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador, chris stevens. joining me now from harvard is nicolas burns, professor of international politics at harvard's kennedy school, and the former u.s. ambassador to nato, greece, and a number of other places. nick, great to see you. you are such an old hand, veteran diplomat, and were at least at the state department. i think you were serving in greece. the last time we had one of these major reports, which was on the 1998 bombings. this report has been done by two senior experienced people, tom pickering and admiral mike mullen, and my indications are that it is really going to be very tough on the state department. hillary clinton has to defend this and present it to congress. >> well, andrea, i don't have a preliminary indication of what the report was saying, but i think secretary clinton would drae grae to testify publicly, but there are obviously congress has an obligation i think they have chosen to highly objective non-political, non-partisan people in tom pickering, ambassador tom pickering, and admiral mike mullen, and we
this is this. >> i think the threat of u.s. airpower is enormous. when we put the u.s. naval air carrier to the syrian armed forces and the u.s. air force, it would be their end within 90 days, so i think there's a huge deterrent capacity from the president's announcement. if he uses chemicals, we could go after his delivery system. if we could go after the -- i heard a discussion, you couldn't really bomb them because you would set them off. that's what we do. we go after them with very hot munition to try and destroy them before they were used. do we really know where they are, have they moved them, consealed them? it's a tough target. >> one more question. al misra, this group that is alive with al qaeda in iraq, the u.s. is set to designate that as a terror organization, but among the rebel leaders, they, like al misra because they are openly the al qaeda leaders are openly recruiting there among the rebels. how does this complicate hillary clinton's task this week going to mare concern and preparing to designate a rebel group as the new interim operational leaders. >> well, tough to
. >>> michael nutter, the president of the u.s. conference of mayors joining us from philadelphia. mr. mayor, thank you very much. >> thank you, andrea. >> you have been all over this issue, but now do you see an opening because of this horrendous tragedy to get people mobilized? >> andrea, i think the conversation has really shifted all across the country. i do believe that we've reached a tipping point here, and usually when you see that happen on any number of issues, different people are prepared possibly to take different action than maybe they were in the past. this is a horrific tragedy. it has really fwrached people in very, very different ways, and as saddened as we've always been about tucson or aurora, other places, and certainly death and carnage on our streets all across the cities of america, this particular incident, i think, is a culmination of a variety of these massacre type incidents that we've seen over the last few years, and they're increasingly happening. the issues of high capacity weapons, these magazines, assault weapons being used, body armor available out in the o
are we heading here? is the regime, first of all we understand that the u.s. is going to recognize the occupation -- opposition next week. is the regime close to teetering and do we have to worry about the chemical weapons? >> yes. the answer is secretary clinton is right on. we do have to worry about them. i had a briefing this morning regarding this. obviously i can't release any classified details, but sufficient to say that the threat is real. the warning is real. we have made it crystal clear, president obama, secretary clinton, be have made it absolutely clear as have other countries this is a red line and i believe president assad has received that message from several quarters. the question now is, you know, will someone else grab on to them? there's certainly risks where we are with respect to syria. i would not close the door completely to some kind of an agreement whereby president assad could move to another country and the reason i say that is, that the dangers of an imploding syria, of the complete implosion of the state, are really serious and contrary to the nationa
're being cautioned this is no break through but there will be follow-up meeting. seems some u.s. officials russia is hedging its bets or beginning to see a future without assad. >> i think that's the case. we've talked about this before, but there is a russian card to be played, to be played by russia itself. they have influence with president assad, they have interests in syria, and i think that they can see the handwriting on the wall that assad is eventually going to go, whether it's in the near term, long term, eventually he's going. you can see the shift in momentum as far as the rebels now starting to gain much greater military success than they have in the past. they've been weapons that have been able to take some helicopters out of the air, shoulder-fired missiles, et cetera. i think they can see the shift taking place and want to be in a position to help negotiate some sort of an acceptable ending to this where they can play the role of a peacemaker. so i think not with standing their hedging or appearing to hedge their bets this ink that ir' going to play a positive role here to
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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